5 Practical Steps To Improve Your ACT Science Score

There are two particular skills that you need to cultivate so that you can improve your ACT science score. Mainly, they are your 1) Reasoning skills, and 2) Analytical skills. You should be proficient when it comes to identifying data that are presented in graphs, tables and maps and in interpreting questions logically. If you are keen enough, you will find that most of the problems in the ACT Science test actually provide more information than what is necessary so that you can respond to the test items properly.

Contrary to what many students believe, your knowledge of Science branches such as Chemistry, Biology, Earth Science and Physics will not be tested directly in the Science section of the ACT. Not that you have to be well-versed with every Scientific concept that has been tackled in your high school classes as well. What you have to prioritize in order to improve your Science score are your abilities to reason accurately and solve certain problems using Scientific methods.

Your skills in Scientific reading comprehension will be challenged in the test. You need to be meticulous in analyzing and drawing conclusions from graphs, charts, tables and experimental processes. But you don’t have to fret because the passages in the Science test contain all the information that you need. Here are some tips to help you boost your score in the ACT Science test:

Helpful Tips To Boost Your ACT Science Score

  • Familiarize yourself with the types of questions and passages found in the test. There are 3 types of passages that are featured in the ACT Science test: 1) Conflicting Viewpoints (7 questions); 2) Research Summaries (6 questions), and 3) Data Representation (5 questions). These passages may be presented in a different order, but usually, test -takers are bound to encounter 3 five question sections, along with 3 six question sections and a single section that is comprised of 7 questions in the test.
  • Keep your calm when taking the test. Don’t worry so much if you haven’t brushed up on each and every Science concept taught in your school. You actually don’t need to memorize them in the ACT Science test. Remember to primarily hone your abilities in interpreting and analyzing Scientific problems, and you’ll do fine.
  • Learn proper time management. Note that you have to deal with 7 passages and 40 questions in the Science section in 35 minutes. Time element is thus your biggest hurdle. It also means that you have to be quick in answering the questions if you want to finish the section on time. Be systematic and refrain from lingering on a certain passage. Be quick in your reading by extracting the main points and analyzing figures. Take note of the difficult questions and leave them for the time being as you answer the easier ones. Get back to these tricky items when you have remaining time.
  • Cultivate your test-taking skills by taking practice tests. A reliable way of improving your ACT Science test score is to take real Science tests and solve real Science problems. Just like the actual ACT test scenario, time yourself when taking ACT Science practice tests. At the end of this task, analyze your erroneous answers and decipher why you got them wrong.
  • Ask for the help of a tutor, mentor or your fellow test-takers. You can self-study for the Science section of the ACT test, but getting help from someone who has more authority on the subject or your peers can make a big difference for you to improve your ACT Science score.

Renaissance Science and The Electromagnetic Technology of Platonic Love.

The Fullerene Chemistry life-science of the three 1996 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry was based upon the synergistic engineering principles of Buckminster Fuller, which challenged the basis of 20th Century science. Harvard University’s Novatis Professor, Amy Edmonson in her online book titled ‘The Fuller Explanation’ explains that Buckminster Fuller derived his engineering principles from the mathematics of the Greek philosopher Plato. Most people have heard of the term ‘Platonic love’ and now that Platonic-Fullerene Chemistry has come into existence, we might ask the question, what practical engineering principles might be associated with Platonic love?

To answer that question we can examine how the new chemistry challenges the general understanding of modern science. The NASA High Energy Astrophysics Division library has published papers arguing that the Platonic tradition of Greek philosophy was based upon fractal geometrical logic. All life-sciences within the present accepted understanding of science, can only be about species moving toward extinction. This is because Einstein’s ‘Premier law of all Science’ demands the total destruction of all life in the universe when all of its heat is radiated away into cold space. On the other hand, Plato’s ethical logic is based upon fractal geometry, which we know extends life-science to infinity. The New Measurement of Humanity Project at the University of Florence, on September 24th 2010, was honoured with the Georgio Napolitano Medal on behalf of the Republic of Italy. The Project’s upgrading of quantum mechanics to quantum biology, agreed with Plato’s logic.

The practical engineering principles we seek, belongs to the difference between aesthetics and ethics. Ethics can now be considered to be part of science itself, rather that being considered to be only about how we use science. We can explain the difference in simplistic terms rather than complex electromagnetic biological terms that belongs to quantum biology. We know that the old chemistry we have, does indeed obey Einstein’s law of Universal decay. However, we know from the discovery of Sir Isaac Newton’s unpublished papers, discovered last century, that Newton held the firm conviction that a more profound natural philosophy existed to balance the energy decay of the mechanical universe. Newton’s principles, responsible for this balance, belonged to Plato’s lost ‘Science for ethical ends’.

During the 18th Century, the philosopher Immanuel Kant defined aesthetics as the theory of art appreciation, but he also sought ethics technology from within the electromagnetic theories of his day, an electric motor to make the one we know as a child’s toy by comparison. Kantian aesthetics in the 21st Century has become the basis of a moral logic to guide various types of organisations. An interest in ethical electromagnetic biological science is re-emerging, because of the new Platonic-Fullerene Chemistry.

Any aesthetic consciousness in the beauty of, say, a painting of a lovely mountain range with majestic waterfalls, is about seeing beauty in decay, the waterfalls are eating away at the structure of the mountain. The aesthetic feeling, therefore, belongs to the material world of destructive reality, but it inspires a peaceful harmonic creative intuition in the mind. The Nobel Laureate in Medicine, Svent-Gyoergyi, was so insistent that this material decay was balanced by the evolution of consciousness, that he called scientists who did not realise this, crazy apes and wrote a book with that title. We can now begin to think that the mental harmonics associated with mareialistc aesthetics and the evolution of the mind, might have some great universal ethical purpose and begin to look for the new technologies that Immanuel Kant intuitively glimpsed. This is about the optical spiritual, or holographic, engineering principles that Plato wrote about.

The harmonic balancing of the decay of matter with Sir Isaac Newton’s more natural profound balancing philosophy, describes some sort of entanglement between the the energies of decay and evolving creative consciousness. This is known as quantum entanglement, a process existing between quantum mechanics and quantum biology. The biologist Dr Carl Johan Calleman, author of the book ‘The Purposeful Universe’ has quantised the functioning of the human cell. This allows us to identify the rather incredible nature of Immanuel Kant’s sought for ethical electromagnetc ethical technology.

Dr Callerman notes that the male sperm propels itself to the ovum by a tiny electromagnetic motor, which is driving its tail. Upon entry to the ovum, the male motor morphs into a balanced Yin-Yang motor of life. This spark of life programs a universal message of evolution to the first bone created within the embryo, the sphenoid bone. The sphenoid vibrates with the seashell design of the inner ear, to provide the electromagnetic music of life that Plato referred to as Pythagoras’ Music of the Spheres. Dr Richard Merrick of Texas University, in his book ‘Interference’ has mapped out the electromagnetic functioning of the Music of the Music of the Spheres within the functioning of evolving consciousness.

The Science-Art Research Centre of Australia discovered the mathematical structure of the Music of the Spheres governing the evolution of seashells through millions of years through space-time The discovery was reprinted by the worlds largest technological research institute IEEE SPIE Milestone Series in Washington in 1990. In 1995 the work won the Institute for Basic Research’s Biology Prize for the discovery of new physics laws governing optimum biological growth and development through space-time. Since then, it has been discovered that the human sphenoid bone sings the same Music of the Spheres song of life, meaning that it is now possible to discover a practical technology from what was once called Plato’s optical spiritual engineering principles.

The Science-Art Centre obtained experimental evidence by using special 3-D Glasses, of the existence of Plato’s spiritual optics by discovering that, over the centuries some artists had unconsciously depicted holographic images into their paintings. The new technology is about humankind’s evolving understanding of the nature of Einstien’s protege, David Bohm’s, infinite holographic universe. Now that the difference between aesthetics and ethics is understood, humankind is poised upon the threshold of what buckminster Fuller referred to as Uopia or Oblivion.

Within the Platonic tradition of Greek philosophy, Aristotle’s ethical science was designed to become the basis of an ennobling medical politics for the health of the universe, so that the universe would not allow civilisation to become extinct. The Platonic-Fullerene Chemistry is part of that political medical science and it has no place for any aesthetic obsession to dominate politics or religious persuasions. For example, aesthetical appreciation of blond blue eyed people becoming a master race is not ethical, as also was using the aesthetics of Angel Physics to legalise the torture and burning alive of countless women and children as witches.

The 2008 Nobel Prize Winner in Medicine Dr Luc Montagnier, is among an emerging group of scholars who claim that evidence has been obtained to show that DNA can transport imprints of itself electromagnetically. To make teleportation ethical it would be necessary to change the general assumption that nature will find some way to cull overpopulation. Transparent global medical scientific research, available to the people must come into existence to allow ethical debate on such issues to occur. That very process, acting in defiance of being governed by the present understanding of unbalanced entropic decay, will demonstrate the existence of new technologies, for the betterment of the human condition, far beyond the ability of an entropic mindset to even imagine.

Professor Robert Pope (C)

As the Future Abstract Science of Nanotech – The Best Book You’ll Ever Read on the Topic

As mankind unlocks all the secrets of our DNA, and learns how to use nanotechnology to genetically engineer humans the potential is unlimited. We will be able to enhance our muscles, brains, and participate in life extension technologies. Some of this may sound like science fiction, but that’s exactly where nanotechnology in biotech is headed. Many futurists and scientists in these fields portray an interesting, exciting, and even scary future.

One of the best books I’ve ever read on this subject, and one which ranks up there with the top science fiction writers of past periods has allowed my mind to go beyond today, and into the future. The future of Nanotech and all the emerging sciences, which are now inter-related will fascinate you. If this topic interests you, I’d like to recommend a very good book, which you will enjoy and love. It’s definitely a classic, although it is in a very esoteric niche. The name of the book is;

“Engines of Creation – What We Might Become,” by Eric Drexler; Bantam books division Doubleday Dell, New York, NY, 1986, (298 pp.), ISBN: 0385199724.

This book is in my personal library, and it will stay there. Recently, I’ve been weeding out some of the old books that I no longer want, and I came across this book once again. As I was paging through it, I realized it was written in 1986, it occurred to me that many of the things that Drexler had predicted, have now come to be. Many of the Nanotech initiatives which are being funded and the research which is being done is making breakthroughs strides in neurology, biotech, pharmaceutical, medicine, material sciences, and so much more.

Sometimes, it pays to look back at the visionaries who helped put us on the path to our modern technology of today. I’m going to recommend that you buy this book, read it, and then go explore where this technology is going in the future, and how far it has already come. Please consider all this.

Beyond Biology

Three disparate things that I read recently made me sit up and take another look at the threat that biotechnology poses to the future of humankind. The first was an announcement made by scientists of the J Craig Venter Institute on their work on genome transplantation that enabled them to transform one kind of bacteria to another type. This is the first time in history that a completely synthetic organism has been created. The second was a declaration made by Sir Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal and former President of British Association for the Advancement of Science – considered to be one of the most eminent scientists of today. He states “I have staked one thousand dollars on a bet: That by the year 2020, an instance of bio-error or bio-terror will have killed one million people.” The third was that scientists at the Shanghai Second Medical University have created the first human/animal Chimera (animal containing genetic material from parents of two or more distinctly different species) fusing together cells from humans and rats.

The first piece of information shows that biotechnology is racing ahead at breakneck speed and has the ability to change things in a fundamental way. This ability has already been translated into the development of drugs and other products – biotechnology now produces 40 per cent of the drugs that the US Food and Drug Administration approves of every year.

The second indicates that scientists of the calibre of Sir Martin Rees believe that it is likely that this ability could be used with malicious intent. Bio-weapons are the ideal weapons for terrorist and/or anarchists. The cost of setting up a laboratory for biotech research is significantly smaller than that of developing nuclear or chemical weapons. The manufacture of lethal toxins requires modest equipment, essentially the same as is needed for medical or agricultural programmes: the technology is “dual use”.

Research teams have been able to reconstitute the polio virus, as well as the 1918 pandemic influenza virus (that killed somewhere between 20 to 40 million people) using only published DNA information and raw material from mail order services. This knowledge and technology is already dispersed among hospital staff, academic research institutes and factories. Bioterrorism is thus a real possibility in the next decade with the invention of ways of killing that had previously existed only in the realm of science fiction.

Sir Martin Rees also mentions the possibility of error on the part of otherwise responsible laboratories and agencies. Ed Hammond of the Sunshine Project in Texas that monitors the use of biological agents says that lab accidents happen a lot more frequently than the public knows. In recent years, the spread of Foot and Mouth Disease in the UK (2007), the death of a lab worker at Texas A&M ( 2006) due to brucellosis after cleaning a high containment container, the exposure of 3 researchers at Boston University Medical Centre (2004) to tularaemia or rabbit fever have occurred.. All these laboratories are well run and subject to many regulations. The same cannot be said for other laboratories in different parts of the world. Perhaps the worst bio-error took place in 1979 in the former Soviet Union when weapons-grade anthrax escaped from a facility in Sverdlovsk, now known as Yekaterinburg, killing 68 people. The accident was covered up by the authorities and came to light only in 1998.

If there is a major outbreak in the future, there may be severe clamping down by governmental authorities on the kind of research and agents that can be used in experimentation. This however would not have impact on research in rouge laboratories or by anti-social elements.

The Human Chimera experiment in China is one that could not have been able to be carried out in any other country in the world. Most do not, at least at present, have the scientific capability. Those that do, such as the US and Western Europe have strict codes of ethics and regulations in place that expressly forbid such experimentation. Even between the US and Europe however, there is a vast difference in the regulatory framework. In the US, products of biotechnology have been extensively tested and marketed. In the EU, few biotechnology products have received regulatory approval while most have faced a de facto moratorium.

Many countries do not have any kind of regulatory framework relating to biotechnology or restrictions on the kind of research that can be carried out. Frightening experiments could be conducted, without the knowledge of the rest of the world, or authorities within the countries themselves. These could even attract groups to set up research facilities in the future- the same principle that attracts groups and individuals to tax havens such as Barbados, St Kitts, Canary Islands etc.

The advancements made in the field of biotechnology have the potential to change the life of humankind for the better by impacting health, eradicating disease and creating miracle drugs. But we need to also ponder seriously on what we need to do to prevent Sir Martin Rees’ wager coming true.